It’s Not Too Late To Start 2015 Off Right

It’s Not Too Late To Start 2015 Off Right

  Join us for a complimentary educational event to start the new year off right. The Kennedy Financial Group is proud to bring in featured presenter, Sam Gumma, from the American Funds. He will be discussing, “Creating Clarity from Confusion” – a perspective on the impact of media and our financial decisions. When: February 5th, 6 p.m. Where: Granite City Food & Brewery 699 West Big Beaver Troy, MI 48084 According to a recent Gallup poll, public confidence in newspapers and television is only 23%. Unfortunately, how we view the world — and make decisions impacting our financial futures — can so easily be influenced by what we are hearing. How can investors tune out the constant stream of confusing and often-conflicting information and focus on their long-term financial plans? Our discussion will cover: • The changing role of media over the decades and the impact of 24 hour news coverage. • How to stay focused on your unique financial goals and not get caught up in the hype. • Some exciting developments you might not be hearing about in the media and a roadmap for staying focused on your long-term goals. It’s going to be a fun and educational evening that you don’t want to miss. Dinner will be provided and inviting friends and family is both welcomed and encouraged! Seating is limited, so please contact Lauren by email (lauren.reisig@lpl.com) or call (248-528-0485) with your name and number of guests by February 3rd to R.S.V.P. We look forward to seeing you...
Teach Your Kids How to Save for Retirement

Teach Your Kids How to Save for Retirement

Blog Post Originally From DaveRamsey.com As adults, we know the younger you are when you begin retirement investing the more money you’ll have when it’s time to retire. However, most of us start investing too late to take full advantage of the time we have. But what about your kids? How different could your kids’ future be if they understood how to build wealth before they even graduate high school? You can teach them by starting with simple concepts and building on them over time. Start With the Basics Teach your kids early about the connection between work and money. Even kids as young as three can earn money—and lots of praise—by doing simple jobs like picking up toys. Older kids are ready for regular chores. When they work, they get paid. It’s as simple as that. Help them learn to budget money with three simple categories: give, save and spend. With this foundation, they’ll learn how rewarding it is to set a savings goal and regularly put aside money to reach it—the basis for successful retirement investing! Be a Good Example From an early age, your kids will pay much more attention to what you do rather than what you say—and that goes for money matters as well. They need to see how living on a budget, avoiding debt, and consistent investing helps you achieve your financial goals, so include them in that process. Even when your kids come down with a case of the “gimmes” (give me this, give me that), use the opportunity to talk about the importance of saving for the future. Explain that when...
6 Reasons Your Budget Stinks (and What to Do About It)

6 Reasons Your Budget Stinks (and What to Do About It)

Blog Post Originally From DaveRamsey.com One of the best things about the budget? It’s math. Math haters and Free Spirits, keep reading! Math is black and white. There’s no gray area. You want to know why you’re spending $400 more than you make every month? It’s all there in the numbers. You just have to take a little time to think through it. The problem comes when people start budgeting, make some mistakes, and then give up. That’s not a good way to deal with money management issues. The problem won’t magically disappear. So, in the spirit of helping you make it happen in 2015, we thought we’d identify some of the issues you might have with your budget and how to remedy each one. 1. You don’t budget. This isn’t rocket science, and we’re not trying to play some voodoo trick on you. It’s just that, well, your budget might stink because you don’t have a written, zero-based budget in the first place. So that’s where you’ve got to start. Our Monthly Cash Flow Plan can help. 2. You and your partner aren’t on the same page. If you think car loans and adjustable rate mortgages are perfectly fine but your spouse feels otherwise, then your relationship is going to have problems. There’s no way you can manage your money well when the two people who control the budget completely disagree on basic ways to spend their income. Listen to each other and come up with a plan that works for both of you. 3. You pick a number, any number. Ever done this? Maybe you’re not sure what the...
3 Money Fights You’ll Have This Year (and How to Prepare)

3 Money Fights You’ll Have This Year (and How to Prepare)

Blog Post Originally From DaveRamsey.com Once a couple opens up and starts talking about money, it’s not unusual for them to disagree about how to handle it—even if they’re working toward a common goal like getting out of debt. If you don’t believe it, check out some calls to The Dave Ramsey Show where couples have decided to let Dave settle their money disagreements. So what types of disagreements can you expect? They generally fall into three categories, and most of the time, you can tell a fight is coming. So arm yourself with a little patience, a little grace and a whole lot of common sense, and maybe you can keep your disagreements from becoming knock-down, hair-flying, name-calling household fights. I didn’t marry Dave Ramsey. This argument is the culmination of a thousand “Dave Ramsey says …” comments. You know how it happens. You’re trying to have a discussion about next month’s grocery budget or if you can afford to add $10 to your blow money, when your spouse responds with, “Well, Dave says …” Whether Dave really says it or not, this tactic will not win the argument or change anyone’s mind. Stop beating your spouse up with “Dave says …” and have a real discussion about your money issues—just the two of you. But we owe it to ourselves. In this corner: Debt Buster, so gazelle intense that he collects coins from the sofa and uses them to pay extra on the credit card. And in this corner: Burned Out, who’s just looking for a break from all the budgeting and debt snowballing. Burned Out strikes...